Differentiation for Transition Students!

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Differentiation for Transition Students!

Danielle CarrollOther (Home, Special Ed, etc)

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I teach at a private severe special needs school in a class of five 18-21 year old transition students. Two of my students have visual impairments- one is completely blind and one requires enlarged print on materials. All the students in my class require a sensory diet for instruction according to their plans. Our work, classroom work centers, and bulletin boards reflect my students physical disabilities as well as their IEP goals. My students goals focus primarily on career, adult and 21st century life skills. Our bulletin board focuses primarily on identifying safety signs in the community, I’ve included braille signage on each of the signs so that and stickers that record phrases requires a reader pen. When they touch the reader pen to the stickers it will read the answer to them so that they can check their work. I made a large calendar in our math center so that all students can work on identifying the date, month, day of the week and any holidays or birthdays. Our reading corner has a variety of chairs to satisfy sensory needs, an iPod player that plays soothing music/nature sounds/various music related to our reading lessons. We also complete a morning group and yoga in this area.

I teach at a private severe special needs school in a class of five 18-21 year old transition students. Two of my students have visual impairments- one is completely blind and one requires enlarged print on materials. All the students in my class require a sensory diet for instruction according to their plans. Our work, classroom work centers, and bulletin boards reflect my students physical disabilities as well as their IEP goals. My students goals focus primarily on career, adult and 21st century life skills. Our bulletin board focuses primarily on identifying safety signs in the community, I’ve included braille signage on each of the signs so that and stickers that record phrases requires a reader pen. When they touch the reader pen to the stickers it will read the answer to them so that they can check their work. I made a large calendar in our math center so that all students can work on identifying the date, month, day of the week and any holidays or birthdays. Our reading corner has a variety of chairs to satisfy sensory needs, an iPod player that plays soothing music/nature sounds/various music related to our reading lessons. We also complete a morning group and yoga in this area.